HIDDEN PACIFIC

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Hidden Pacific Image Captions (20KB)
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Hidden Pacific 1 (12,308KB)
An aerial view of Rose Atoll, one of the most pristine atolls in the world, and home to many threatened and endangered species. Located in the South Pacific Ocean, at the southernmost point in the United States, Rose Atoll Marine National Monument covers approximately 13,400 square miles and encompasses the Rose Atoll National Wildlife Refuge. The atoll is part of American Samoa, a United States territory.
Hidden Pacific 2 (10,700KB)
Wake Atoll is a coral atoll located in the western Pacific Ocean. The submerged and emergent lands at the atoll are a unit of the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument. Wilkes Island, at the farthest tip in this photo, is a completely protected area for wildlife as a National Wildlife Refuge.
Hidden Pacific 3 (18,283KB)
Charlie Pelizza, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (retired), walks across the crustose coralline algae (CCA) in Rose Atoll National Wildlife Refuge, which is part of the Rose Atoll Marine National Monument. Crustose coralline algae is decreasing due to ocean acidification; however, some coral species that grow among the CCA are displaying signs of thriving in warmer waters and may unlock clues about coral resilience that could inform the research on coral protection throughout the world.
Hidden Pacific 4 (11,147KB)
Short-tailed albatross on Midway Atoll in the North Pacific Ocean. The short-tailed albatross is a large seabird with a seven-foot wingspan. Its population is precariously small, although Midway Atoll provides a critical nesting habitat that may eventually help stabilize the population.
Hidden Pacific 5 (7,076KB)
Portrait of a brown booby on Wake Atoll. The brown booby, one of the more common in the booby family, is a large seabird that nests in small colonies on the ground and feeds on fish by plunging into the water at an angle or by seizing flying fish from the air. It's also known to steal fish from other birds. Atolls provide vital nesting grounds away from predators.
Hidden Pacific 6 (5,459KB)
Giant manta rays and convict tangs swimming in Palmyra Atoll National Wildlife Refuge. Part of the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument, Palmyra Atoll is home to a dizzying array of wildlife. The main threat to the manta ray is commercial fishing, and in 2018 the species was listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act.
Hidden Pacific 7 (8,430KB)
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service staff and volunteers tag Kukini, an offspring of the Laysan albatross, Wisdom, the world's oldest known bird.
Hidden Pacific 8 (14,967KB)
Palmyra Atoll National Wildlife Refuge, which is part of the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument. The Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument is the largest marine protected area in the world and contains the most widespread collection of marine life on the planet under a single country's jurisdiction.
Hidden Pacific 9 (21,818KB)
A snorkeler with the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service approaches a school of convict tangs in the shallow waters of Palmyra Atoll National Wildlife Refuge, which is part of the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument.
Hidden Pacific 10 (19,326KB)
At low tide, the turquoise blue waters and coralline algae of the reefs on Rose Atoll Marine National Monument create a look similar to the hot springs in Yellowstone National Park. Though unlike Yellowstone, the water is a cool(er) 84 degrees.
Hidden Pacific 11 (8,196KB)
Midway Atoll was the site of a pivotal World War II battle, the Battle of Midway. Remnants of that battle are still visible, and the Battle of Midway National Memorial there honors those who served their country.
Hidden Pacific 12 (15,221KB)
The 98 Rock on Wake Atoll marks the location of a mass grave for American prisoners of war that had been executed by the Japanese shortly before American forces liberated the island. These American civilian POWs were reburied after the war in Honolulu's National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific.
Hidden Pacific 13 (13,237KB)
Portrait of a brown booby with sooty terns in the background on Wake Atoll. Wake Atoll is located in the western Pacific Ocean in the northeastern area of the Micronesia subregion, 1,501 miles east of Guam, 2,298 miles west of Honolulu, and 1,991 miles southeast of Tokyo. The submerged and emergent lands at the atoll are a unit of the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument.
Hidden Pacific 14 (7,175KB)
Palmyra Atoll National Wildlife Refuge is part of the larger Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument. The Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument was established in January 2009 and expanded in 2014. It is located to the south and west of Hawaii and consists of Wake, Baker, Howland, and Jarvis islands, Johnston Atoll, Kingman Reef, and Palmyra Atoll.
Hidden Pacific 15 (15,813KB)
Palmyra Atoll National Wildlife Refuge, which is part of the larger Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument. The Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument is the largest marine protected area in the world and contains the most widespread collection of marine life on the planet under a single country's jurisdiction.
Hidden Pacific 16 (22,058KB)
Remnants of an airplane rest at peace on Palmyra Atoll National Wildlife Refuge, which is part of the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument. These relicts are a reminder of our past and provide a glimpse into the human presence that once appeared in these places.
Hidden Pacific 17 (21,084KB)
Remnants of an airplane rest at peace on Palmyra Atoll National Wildlife Refuge, which is part of the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument. These relicts are a reminder of our past and provide a glimpse into the human presence that once appeared in these places.
Hidden Pacific 18 (18,606KB)
Convict tangs circling the coral on Palmyra Atoll. Widespread in tropical waters, convict tangs are identified in part by the black bars on their bodies. Healthy coral reefs like this provide food, habitat, and shelter for many marine organisms.
Hidden Pacific 19 (21,686KB)
Convict tangs and bluefin trevally in a vibrant coral reef at Palmyra Atoll National Wildlife Refuge. Palmyra Atoll is part of the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument. Juvenile bluefin trevally fish prefer shallow inshore waters as their nursery until they are large enough to brave the open ocean.
Hidden Pacific 20 (19,179KB)
A coconut crab on Palmyra Atoll National Wildlife Refuge, which is part of the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument. Coconut crabs are the largest arthropods (invertebrates) in the world, and they get their name from what they eat.
Hidden Pacific 21 (22,739KB)
Laysan albatross with juvenile on Midway Atoll in the North Pacific Ocean. Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge encompasses over 590,000 acres. In the past, driftnets and longline fisheries killed large numbers of Laysan albatross. Now, many die by swallowing plastic trash in the ocean when they mistake it for food.
Hidden Pacific 22 (10,711KB)
Laysan albatross performing one of their elaborate mating rituals on Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge. Laysan albatross mate for life, and their courtship involves dancing and clucking while often mirroring and mimicking each other.
Hidden Pacific 23 (26,641KB)
Remnants of World War II on Palmyra Atoll National Wildlife Refuge, which is part of the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument.
Hidden Pacific 24 (17,552KB)
Rose Atoll Marine National Monument is a U.S. national monument of approximately 13,400 square miles in the South Pacific Ocean and encompasses the Rose Atoll National Wildlife Refuge. Rose Atoll is one of the smallest atolls in the world; so small that one can walk around it in about 15 minutes. As part of American Samoa, it is the easternmost Samoan island and the southernmost point of the United States.
Hidden Pacific 25 (19,885KB)
An employee on Palmyra Atoll National Wildlife Refuge enjoys some time off in this tropical paradise. None of the marine monuments in the Pacific are accessible to the public, except for government employees, scientists, researchers, and those with permits.
Hidden Pacific 26 (21,659KB)
A snorkeler explores the reefs of Palmyra Atoll National Wildlife Refuge, which is part of the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument. Palmyra Atoll has three times as many coral species than all of Hawaii.
Hidden Pacific 27 (16,150KB)
A coconut crab on Palmyra Atoll National Wildlife Refuge, which is part of the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument. Coconut crabs are the largest arthropods (invertebrates) in the world, and they get their name from what they eat - coconuts!
Hidden Pacific 28 (17,832KB)
The stunning colors of the coral reef on Palmyra Atoll National Wildlife Refuge, which is part of the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument.
Hidden Pacific 29 (22,971KB)
An employee of the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service explores the underwater world on Palmyra Atoll National Wildlife Refuge, which is part of the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument.